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Planning and installing your SBS 2003 server

In 8 chapters we will explain a basic installation of SBS 2003 Standard and Premium. From choosing the right hardware, creating arrays and partitions to installing the Premium parts if you chosen that. Windows Small Business Server 2003 (codenamed Bobcat) Consists of Windows Server 2003 and includes Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, Microsoft Outlook 2003, Windows SharePoint Services 2.0, and optionally Microsoft SQL Server 2000, ISA Server 2000 (upgrade to ISA Server 2004 in Small Business Server Premium SP1), and Microsoft FrontPage 2003 in Premium edition; allows 75 client licenses. Service Pack 1 for Windows Small Business Server 2003 was released on July 25, 2005.

Installing your SBS 2003 server and do it right the first time. For novice administrators that seems a real challenge but with this guide it will not be as difficult as it looks. If you follow the advice and steps in this tutorial you will have your server up and running within a day.


Get the right hardware

The server, what processor, how much memory, what disk drives and to rack mount or not to rack mount...that is the question.

For the explanations of the UPS and Switch I have used text from Wikipedia.

I tend to keep things simple. In the table you can see what hardware specifications I use for SBS 2003 Standard and Premium. In the examples you see I point to Hewlett Packard products because I happen to know those very well. You can get similar configurations from IBM, Dell or any manufacturer. I do not sell hardware nor do I get paid by any hardware company for writing this document. As a matter of fact I hate hardware and I use a partner that takes care of the hardware sales and support. I only install, configure and maintain servers with SBS 2003 installed. In some rare circumstances I offer advice on what to buy and that is the reason for this article. In our forum I see lots of discussions about unwise decisions on hardware and I want to prevent this from happening. I am open for discussions about hardware in our new forum.

If you are new to choosing hardware for your server there is one mistake you should not make. Do not buy a server with an on board Sata Raid adapter and do not use Sata drives in a server. It just does not work or it will fail within no time. I have seen this happening over and over again. People want to save some money on hardware but in the end they pay it twice...

If you are a business owner and use a consultant who offers to build you a server, please make sure you verify with the consultant that they use Microsoft Genuine software and ONLY parts that are on the HCL list.  You will also want to make sure that their systems have been well tested to provide you with reliable service.  Please use caution when using a consultant as not all consultants are the same.

The choice if you opt for a Single Xeon, Single Opteron or a Pentium Dual Core for a SBS 2003 Standard or Premium with less then 10 users depends on if the company will grow very quickly. If you expect to have more then 10 users within the next 2 years I would always offer a Xeon or Opteron system and I would install immediately 2 processors. There are people who like Intel and there are who like AMD. At the moment I am writing this article I would offer an Opteron system because it out-performs Intel on many aspects.

To rack mount or not to rack mount...that is the question. If the customer will be adding more servers like a terminal server I would opt for a rack mounted server like the HP ProLiant DL380 G5 Server or a HP ProLiant DL385 Server. The last one is an AMD Opteron system. 

Your backup device

There is a lot of debate going on lately what backup device is the right one. For smaller organizations I would use 3 portable USB drives and swap those daily. For larger organizations I would choose good old tape drives. Good examples are DLT/SDLT Tape Drives or Ultrium Tape Drives. Both offer huge storage capacities up 800 Gb.

The switch and your cables

Bad switches or bad cables can cause many hours of searching when something goes wrong on your server. You may think it is a problem on the server but many problems are caused by bad switches and/or cabling. Get Cat 5e cabling if you can. Cat 5e cable is an enhanced version of Cat 5 that adds specifications for far-end crosstalk. It replaced the specification for Cat 5 with the 2001 introduction of the TIA/EIA-568-B standard. Although 1000BASE-T was designed for use with Cat 5 cable, the tighter specifications associated with Cat 5e cable and connectors make it an excellent choice for use with 1000BASE-T. Despite the stricter performance specifications, Cat 5e cable does not enable longer cable distances for Ethernet networks: horizontal cables are still limited to a maximum of 90m (295ft) in length. Cat 5e cable performance characteristics and test methods are defined in TIA/EIA-568-B.2-2001.

Hubs vs switches

A hub, or repeater, is a fairly unsophisticated broadcast device. Any packet entering any port is broadcast out on every port and thus hubs do not manage any of the traffic that comes through their ports. Since every packet is constantly being sent out through every port, this results in packet collisions, which greatly impedes the smooth flow of traffic. A switch isolates ports, meaning that every received packet is sent out only to the port on which the target may be found (assuming the proper port can be found; if it is not, then the switch will broadcast the packet to all ports except the port the request originated from). Since the switch intelligently sends packets only where they need to go the performance of the network can be greatly increased. More expensive switches can also do several other operations, such as isolating ports from each other by placing them in different VLANs, or allowing snooping by copying all packets on some set of ports to a special "sniffer" port. This leaves the question of when a switch is most appropriate, versus a hub. If most of the network traffic involves only a few ports, then there will be little performance gain achieved by upgrading from a hub to a switch. But if the traffic involves more than a few ports, using a switch can yield a significant improvement in performance. Also, modern Fast Ethernet switches designed for small office / home office (SOHO) use are priced comparably to hubs, making use of a hub somewhat pointless if new equipment must be purchased anyway. Because data is only routed through the correct port and not broadcast indiscriminately as with hubs, switches are somewhat more secure. Were a user with the intent of capturing other users' data to run Ethereal in promiscuous mode while connected through a switch, they'd find that they'd only see their own data. In contrast, a hub would broadcast all traffic that is not encrypted to all users. This said, even the extra security provided by switches can still be breached with techniques such as MAC flooding and ARP spoofing. For Gigabit Managed switches have a look at HP Switch 2800 series.

The router and/or DSL modem

It is not easy to give you any advice on this because every country has different DSL standards. The trick is to put a router or a router with a build in DSL modem in front of your SBS. This way we split the Lan and Wan in two seperated networks and that makes your infrastructure more secure.

An UPS (Uninterrupted Power Supply)

Last but not least and mostly forgotten. An uninterruptible power supply (UPS), sometimes called an uninterruptible power source, is a device which maintains a continuous supply of electric power to connected equipment by supplying power from a separate source when utility power is not available. A UPS is inserted between the source of power (typically commercial utility power) and the load it is protecting. When a power failure or abnormality occurs, the UPS will effectively switch from utility power to its own power source almost instantaneously. While not limited to any particular type of equipment, a UPS is typically used to protect computers, telecommunication equipment or other electrical equipment where an unexpected power disruption could cause injuries, fatalities, serious business disruption or data loss. UPS units come in sizes ranging from units which will backup a single computer without monitor (around 200 VA) to units which will power entire data centers or buildings (several megawatts). Larger UPS units typically work in conjunction with generators. Historically, UPS units were very expensive and were most likely to be used on expensive computer systems and in areas where the power supply is interrupted frequently. However, UPS units are now more affordable, and have become an essential piece of equipment for data centers and business computers, but are also used for personal computers, entertainment systems and more. In North America in particular, the electrical grid is under increasing strain particularly during heavy demand periods such as summer when air conditioning use is at its highest. In order to prevent blackouts, electrical utilities will sometimes use a process called load shedding, which involves cutting the power to large groups of customers for short periods of time. The single biggest event that brought attention to the need for UPS power backup units was the 2003 North America blackout in the north-eastern US and eastern Canada.

Choosing a UPS

Besides choosing a UPS design, there are 2 key ratings to be aware of when choosing a UPS unit. The first is the VA and wattage ratings. Both the VA (volt amp) and wattage ratings represent the maximum amount of load that can be plugged into a UPS in different ways. The connected load typically should not exceed 80% of either UPS rating. Special considerations must be made when connecting certain equipment such as printers or any type of motorized load. The second factor in deciding which unit to purchase is the amount of runtime the unit will be able to provide when the power fails. This number will vary with the load amount that is plugged into the UPS. For example, a unit may run a single computer for 30 minutes, but with 2 computers plugged in, it might only last 15 minutes. Larger units typically can provide more runtime for the same load than smaller units, however that is not always the case. Some UPS units are designed to provide extended runtime or have the ability to have external battery packs connected. APC offers a selector that makes it really easy to choose the correct UPS for your server.

Service and support

Do not try to save money on hardware support. Companies like Hewlett Packard, Dell or IBM offer nice support packages for your hardware. Purchase those support packs when you have decided on your server. Hewlett Packard offers so called HP Care Pack Services. You can see an overview of those Care Packs here.


Understanding network infrastructure

There are many ways you can setup a SBS network but we are going to build a multi homed SBS network. This means that the server has two network adapters, one for the private network (Lan) and one for the public network (Wan).

For the explanations of the terms I have used text from Wikipedia.

Terminology explained

  • A local area network or LAN is a computer network covering a small local area, like a home, office, or small group of buildings such as a home, office, or college. Current LANs are most likely to be based on switched Ethernet or Wi-Fi technology running at 10, 100 or 1,000 Mbit/s.
  • A wide area network or WAN is a computer network covering a broad geographical area. Contrast with personal area networks (PANs), metropolitan area networks (MANs) or local area networks (LANs) that are usually limited to a room, building or campus. The most well-known example of a WAN is the Internet.
  • A router is a computer networking device that forwards data packets across a network toward their destinations, through a process known as routing. Routing occurs at layer 3 (the Network layer e.g. IP) of the OSI seven-layer protocol stack.
  • Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional modem can provide. It does this by utilizing frequencies that are normally not used by a voice telephone call, in particular, frequencies higher than normal human hearing. This signal will not travel very far over normal telephone cables, so ADSL can only be used over short distances, typically less than 2 km. Once the signal reaches the telephone company's local office, the ADSL signal is stripped off and immediately routed onto a conventional internet network, while any voice-frequency signal is switched into the conventional phone network. This allows a single telephone connection to be used for both ADSL and voice calls at the same time.
  • DHCP is a protocol used by networked computers (clients) to obtain unique IP addresses, and other parameters such as default router, subnet mask, and IP addresses for DNS servers from a DHCP server. This protocol is used when computers (especially notebooks) are added to a network because these settings are necessary for the host to participate in the network. This setting is periodically refreshed (it expires, meaning the client must obtain another assignment) with typical intervals ranging from one hour to several months, and can, if desired, be set to infinite (never expire). The length of time the address is available to the device it was assigned to is called a lease, and is determined by the server. The DHCP server ensures that all IP addresses are unique, that is, no IP address is assigned to a second client while the first client's assignment is valid (its lease has not expired). Thus IP address pool management is done by the server and not by a human network administrator.

Understanding network infrastructure

The network layout explained.

In the above picture we have a server with two network adapters:

  • The Local Network Adapter that is connected to the Local Area Network (LAN) through a switch or a hub.
  • ISP Network Adapter that is connected to a Connection device that takes care of the connection to the Internet.

In the above setup, the SBS takes care of the connection between your Local Area Network (Lan) and the Connection Device that connects to the Internet. In fact, this makes the SBS server a router that controls all traffic to and from the Connection Device either with or without ISA 2004. In this setup we split traffic on the Local Area Connection and the Public Network and therefore creating a secure environment for your company.

Any Connection device that is connected to the ISP Network Adapter should have a static address schema.

  • The Connection device can be a cable modem with an internet routable IP addresses as long as it does NOT do DHCP. If it does DHCP and that cannot be shut down (I have seen devices that are like a black box and nothing can be changed) you need to put a router between that device and the WAN nic of the SBS. Because there are hundreds of different routers and cable modems it is impossible for me to explain how to configure those.
  • The Connection device can be an ADSL modem that is also a router. Those types of devices are very popular in Europe. A typical Connection device like this is a Speedtouch 546 or the Speedtouch 716. For more information on the different routers and DSL modems please have a look here.

You should never connect a router or DSL modem that is connected to the internet to the Hub or Switch and/or does run a DHCP server in this particular two Nic setup.


Check firmware revision in the Bios

Check firmware revision in the Bios of your server and check the Bios if all is set the way it should be.

It is important that you check if you have the latest firmware installed on your server hardware. Firmware is software that is embedded in a hardware device. In the case of your server it is embedded in the BIOS chip. BIOS, stands for Basic Input/Output System or Basic Integrated Operating System. BIOS refers to the software code run by a computer when first powered on. The primary function of BIOS is to prepare the machine so other software programs stored on various media (such as hard drives, floppies, and CDs) can load, execute, and assume control of the computer. This process is known as booting up.

In order to check the firmware version on your server we need to boot into the Bios screen. On most servers this is done by pressing the Delete or F1 key as soon as you see something appear on your monitor. The screenshots you will see below will differ from your server and please read the manual of your server carefully. Specially upgrading the Bios to a newer version can cause disaster if things go wrong.

Check firmware revision in the Bios of your server

The firmware version of my 'virtual SBS' is 08.00.02 and this is the latest version. Check the web site of your manufacturer for new firmware for your server.

Check firmware revision in the Bios of your server

We need to check if the Bios is set to boot from your CD/DVD drive. The CD/DVD drive has to be listed before your hard drive. If it is not change it. On my server I have to press F10 to save all changes and exit. Once you do that the server will boot with the new settings.

Check firmware revision in the Bios of your server

If you feel uncertain about this procedure please ask your hardware vendor to this for you. If they do it wrong you can blame them.

Links to download pages at vendors:


Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Before you start the installation of SBS do the following:

  1. If you have an UPS connected to your server disconnect it and connect the server without the UPS.
  2. Unplug the device that is connected to your second Nic or ISP Network Adapter.

Insert the first CD and start your server. If you have a special SCSI or SATA Raid adapter you will need to have the drivers for that device ready on a floppy. The amount of time you get to press F6 and install third party drivers is very short and I start hitting F6 as soon as I see the blue screen as shown below. If you fail to install drivers for your SCSI or Raid adapter Windows cannot continue the installation. If you are sure that Windows has drivers for your SCSI or SATA device you can skip pressing F6.

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Choose 'Enter"...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Press F8....

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

I am installing SBS on a virtual machine and I have 16Gb free but your server must have a lot more.

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

I choose to create a Operating System partition as large as 10 GB because I use Virtual Server and have limited space. You should make that partition at least 15 GB or better is 20 GB. You should NOT assign all available space to the boot partition.

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Choose Enter to continue installation...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

I always choose Quick Format....

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Setup is formatting your boot partition...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Setup copies files...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

You may hit Enter to restart the server or just till it does it automatically...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Once the server has booted you may change Regional and Language settings...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Fill in your name and organization...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Fill in your license key...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Fill in the computer name and administrator password...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

This is important. If date and time are not set closely to what it is you can run into problems after the server has been installed. After installation and as soon as the CEICW has been run the server will synch time with a time server on the internet. If your date and time are way out of sync you will need to activate immediately and you do not get any other choices.

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Installing the network components...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

The first part is almost ready and the server has booted...login with the administrator credentials...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

SBS setup is loading components...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

You must cancel this because there are some things that need to be done before we can continue with SBS setup...

Installing the first part of the SBS setup

Click finish...


Partitioning and installing the drivers

In the first part we finished with cancelling SBS setup. This gives us the possibility to create the partitions and install drivers if needed. I always customize the desktop a bit so that it shows My Computer and My Network Places.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

After this I am going to check if all drivers are loaded. For this I right click My Computer and choose Manage.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

In the device manager I check if all devices have drivers loaded. In most cases you will need to install drivers, check the manufacturers website for updated drivers and install them.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Next step is to configure the partitions. As you can see in the next screenshot I have some free space on my drive. It is not much because the screenshots you see are made on a virtual machine and I did not define a very big drive for my 'virtual SBS'...

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Before we can use the unallocated space we need to create a partition and format it. Right click in the 'unallocated' box and choose new partition.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Click next.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Choose to create a Primary partition and click next.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

The default partition size is always the maximum size you can make it. Choose next.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Choose to assign a drive letter. Most of the time it will default to E:. If it does not don't worry, choose the default.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

I always give the second partition the name "Data" because there is where my data will be. Check 'Perform a quick format' and click next. Larns Ernsted from Denmark made a very good remark when I posted a preview of this article in the Platinum Subscribers forum:

We enable Shadow Copies for Shares (Previous versions) on our SBS installations, which our customers are very happy about, as they can recover most deleted files on their own... But there is one nasty issue, which we encountered at a customer with very busy server disks:

For performance reasons we needed to defrag and wanted to do it often and automatically using Diskeeper... then the Diskeeper software warned us that the Shadow Copies agent (provider) in Windows (the part that monitors changes to files on shares and takes snapshots of the changes) cannot tell the difference between a user-change and a change caused by defrag-programs IF the allocation unit is smaller than 16K (this is a limitation in Windows and therefore general to all defrag-programs). The manufacturer of Diskeeper recommends selecting an allocation unit size of 16K or more AND SO DOES MICROSOFT if you want to be able to defrag your drives and to use Shadow Copies for Shares (in other words: the Previous versions feature is severely crippled if you want to defrag your drives every now and then as most or all previous versions will most likely be flushed during a defrag - this happened to us, even though we tried to get around it by performing an offline defrag).

Here is the source: Shadow copies may be lost when you defragment a volume

"If the file system's cluster size is 16 KB or larger, the provider can recognize disk defragmentation I/O and handle it correctly. Microsoft recommends that you use a 16-KB or larger cluster allocation unit size when you format the volume if you plan to defragment volumes that are used for shadow copies of shared folders".

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Click Finish.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

After the format of your partition has finished you should see the Data partition as 'Healthy' and it should show up as the 'Data partition'.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

We are going to give a name to the (C:) partition. Right click in the (C:) box and choose properties

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

Type in the box as shown in the screenshot 'SYSTEM' and click OK. 

Installing the drivers and create the data partition

We now have a System and a Data partition.

Installing the drivers and create the data partition


Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

As discussed in the previous part of this document we will be using a server with two Network Adapters. One is connected to a switch or hub and the other one is connected to a router (connection device) as shown in the picture below.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Before you continue installation you must unplug the connection device that is connected to the ISP Network Adapter in your server. The connection to the Hub or Switch (Local Network Adapter) must remain plugged in during the installation of SBS. If you have any other devices connected to the Switch or Hub that is connected to the Local Network Adapter that is some sort of a DHCP server turn that off. Best practice is to disconnect all devices from the Hub or Switch and have only your server connected. You should never connect a router or DSL modem to the Hub or Switch!

Click on the 'Continue Setup' icon on your desktop.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup is loading components.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

SBS setup wizard has been started.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Enter the information of your company.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

This is a very important screen. Once you have choosen a computer and domain name for your server you cannot change that anymore. You should not use a FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) like company.com. The domain name you choose must end at .local or .lan.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

We choose the network adapter that is enabled and not configured.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

The setup wizard wants you to use 192.168.16.2 as IP address for the server with a subnet mask 255.255.255.0. We choose to accept the defaults.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup asks for the Administrator password. Fill it in otherwise you need to fill that in each time the server needs to boot.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Click next.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup prepares further installation

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

This is a confusing Window. You not do anything. This will window will go away and start installing the Active Directory for you.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

As you see installation continues... that will take awhile. Depending on your server this can take up to an hour to complete...get some coffee

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

After this the server will automatically reboot. Setup will load again and present you more options to choose from. Those options are very important. In our forum it is often asked how to move files away from the system drive because it is filling up. This is the moment to prevent that from happening. As you see in the screen shot we can choose to install 'Server Tools' and 'Exchange Server' on another partition and that is what we are going to do. From the little dropdown menu choose the other partition (E:) for 'Server Tools' and 'Exchange Server'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Once you choose to install 'Server Tools' on the other partition you will be asked if setup should create folders for that. Choose 'Yes'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

After finishing this setup has also moved installation of all Client Applications to the Data (E:) partition. That is what we want! Click next.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Now this is confusing. We get another screen asking us to put files in certain folders. We need to change them all. Click on change folder for the MSDE instance. This is the data store for the Monitoring Instance.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

A Window pops up asking for the path. I just change the C to E.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

This is the result and click OK.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And again you are asked if setup should create the folders, we choose Yes.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

In order to complete this procedure you need to do the same for:

  1. Users Shared Folders
  2. Client Applications Folder
  3. Sent faxes
  4. Exchange Store
  5. Exchange Transaction Logs

Please, do exactly the same as I have described above by only changing the partition letter and do not change anything in the path. The end result should be like the screen shot below. Click next to continue setup.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

You are once more informed about the choices you made. If you need to make changes click back, otherwise choose next.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup is loading more files...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup continues installation. The only thing you need to do is swap CD's....when asked for and that does not take very long.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And setup continues... this part of the setup takes the longest time.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup wants CD 3...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And setup continues...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

More Cd's....

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And setup continues...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And the Outlook CD...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And setup continues...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And setup is ready...click Finish.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Click OK to boot your server...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

SBS 2003 is starting up... tha applying computer settings can take awhile.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Before we continue we have enable the ISP Network Adapter. Right click 'My Network Places' and choose Properties.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Right click the Network Connection that is disabled and choose Properties.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Highlight the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

What you fill in here depends a bit on what kind of router you have. The default gateway is always the IP address the router is running on. We choose to set the IP address to 192.168.1.10 and a subnet mask 255.255.255.0. Click OK to accept the settings.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Click close...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Once the server is complete started and we have enabled and configured the ISP Network Adapter we can continue with the Todo list. Choose 'Connect to the Internet'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Click Next

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Choose Broadband...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Choose 'A direct broadband connection'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

There we have the Network Connection that we previously configured. Choose Next

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Setup configures your connection...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

A summary where we can see that our internal network (Lan) is set to 192.168.16.x and the external (WAN) is set to 192.168.1.10. This way the Lan and Wan are split and this is the best way to setup a SBS. Click Next.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

We need to fill in the Preferred DNS server IP addresses. Those are the IP addresses of your ISP's DNS servers. In my case I use the DNS servers of XS4ALL, yours are different. Ask your ISP for those IP addresses.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

The rest of the procedure to run the CEICW (Configure Email and Internet Connection Wizard) is described in "a href="http://www.smallbizserver.net/Default.aspx?tabid=266&articleType=ArticleView&articleId=100">How to configure the server for Internet access". At the end of the CEICW wizard you are asked if you want to turn on the Pass Policy. I would wait untill the server has been completely installed, choose No.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

You are warned that the server is connected to the Internet and that you should install the latest updates. Click OK. Once you do that Internet Explorer will open a page on microsoft.com and you may close that.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

If you own SBS 2003 Premium you may want to skip the updating part and go to "Planning and installing your SBS server- Part 7 - Installing the Premium part of SBS 2003" We are now going to update all security patches and fixes. The installation we just did of SBS 2003 was done with SP1 Integrated Media. This means we do not have to install SP1 anymore. Choose from the start menu 'Windows Update'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Internet Explorer will open the Windows Update site and you are asked to install some software to enable 'Windows Update' on your server. Click install.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

And once again you are asked to install some software. Click 'Install now'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Choose 'Custom'...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update is looking for updates...this can take awhile to complete.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update cannot install all updates at once. We choose to install all critical updates first and after this we will come back to Windows Update to see what else needs to be installed. Click 'Review and install updates'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update informs us about the updates that must be installed and we choose 'Install Updates'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Accept the EULA...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update starts downloading the updates...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update is installing the updates...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

All updates are installed, click 'Restart Now' to reboot the server.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Once the server has been rebooted we run Windows Update again to install the updates it could not install the first time.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Choose 'Install updates'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update installs the latest updates...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

The last updates were installed successfully. Click 'Close'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update shows you an installation summary. If you see failed or remaining updates you need to run Windows Update again.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Download and install Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer 2.0.

The MBSA tool is very handy to check if your server is completely up to date. I always install that on my servers. You can download the tool here http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/tools/mbsa2/default.mspx. Once installed run MBSA to scan your server. Choose 'Scan a computer'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Choose 'Start scan'...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

MBSA downloads security update information...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

MBSA has completed the scan. It seems some updates are missing.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

We will run Windows Update again. There are the missing updates...choose 'Review and install updates'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

Windows Update installs the updates...

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

The updates are installed, choose 'Close'.

Installing and finishing the installation of SBS 2003 Standard

It is strange but MBSA nor Windows Update detects that you need to install Exchange Service Pack 2. For more information about Exchange Server 2003 SP2 read "a href="http://www.smallbizserver.net/Default.aspx?tabid=266&articleType=ArticleView&articleId=120">How to install SP 2 for Exchange server 2003".


Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

SBS 2003 Premium offers ISA 2004 and SQL 2000. First we are going to install ISA 2004 and get the best Firewall installed on your SBS 2003 server. Put the Premium CD in your CD/DVD drive. Click "Install Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2004". Do not install ISA 2004 any other way, not from the folders on the CD nor from any other source. The ISA 2004 installer on the Premium CD is customized for your SBS 2003 server and has special bits that hook into the CEICW.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The wizard has been started...click next.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Accept the EULA and click next...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Accept the default location and click next...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The wizard will complete installation of ISA 2004...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The installation has been started...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

ISA 2004 setup starts the CEICW...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Choose 'Broadband'...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Choose 'A direct broadband connection'...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Those settings were already entered when we setup the standard part of SBS and ran the CEICW...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Setup shows a summary...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The 'Default Gateway' is the IP address where your router runs on, the DNS server IP addresses are the IP addresses of your ISP's DNS servers and those will be used as forwarders in the DNS server running on your SBS 2003 server.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Choose to 'Enable Firewall'...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

In this example we want to allow traffic to pass the Firewall for email...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We want to enable 'Outlook Web Access' and 'Remote Web Workplace"...click Next.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Because Outlook Web Access uses SSL we need to create a certificate. In the 'Web Server name' you fill in the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name).

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We want to enable the service that takes care of email...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We choose DNS to router email. This means that mail from your SBS is send directly to the recipients email server. If you choose "Forward all e-mail to e-mail server at your ISP" the mail server at your ISP will send mail to the recipients e-mail server. This is also called 'using a Smarthost'...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We choose to use Exchange for our mail. That means we have to have MX records setup for our FQDN.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Our FQDN is smallbizserver.net and all mail for this domain will be delivered to our mail server on the SBS...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We can configure Exchange to remove all dangerous attachments. That is a good idea. You can also configure Exchange to save the removed attachments to a folder for further inspection. Click next...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Setup gives you a summary of the choices you made...click finish.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The CEICW runs and configures your server...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The CEICW has been completed and click close...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

We are asked if we want to turn on the 'Password policy' but for now we choose 'no'...we do that later.

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

MSDE Service Pack 4 is installed. ISA 2004 uses a MSDE instance to save all logging. This is a very nice feature!

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

The installation of ISA 2004 has been completed. Click close...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

You will need to reboot the server to complete the installation of ISA 2004. Click OK...

Installing and updating SBS 2003 Premium

Once the server is up and running again you need to follow:

  1. How to install ISA 2004 Service Pack 2
  2. Check the latest security patches at Microsoft Update.

Installing and backing up your licenses

SBS 2003 comes with 5 Cals but if you have more users or devices you need to purchase addition Cals. Here is how you install those licenses. Choose 'Licensing' from the Server Management console...

Installing and backing up your licenses

There are the 5 licenses that are included in SBS 2003. Click 'Add licenses'...

Installing and backing up your licenses

The license wizard is started...

Installing and backing up your licenses

Agree to the EULA and click Next...

Installing and backing up your licenses

We choose the Internet to activate the new license...

Installing and backing up your licenses

Fill in the license code, click add and click Next...

Installing and backing up your licenses

If everything goes well you will see in the list the extra licenses you just added...

Backup your licenses

It is always a good idea to backup your licenses in case you need to reinstall them. From the server management console open 'Licensing'.

Installing and backing up your licenses

Choose 'Back Up Licenses'.

Installing and backing up your licenses

The Back up wizard has started.

Installing and backing up your licenses

You need to give the backup file a name and extension. In this sample I choose 'license.lic' but you may choose something different. Remember that each time you add licenses to your server you will need to update the license backup file by running the wizard.

Installing and backing up your licenses

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About www.server-essentials.com 

www.server-essentials.com is founded by Mariette Knap, a Dutch Microsoft MVP. www.server-essentials.com is a community for IT Consultants and Business Owners who, themselves, take care of the IT infrastructure and Employees who do that little extra in the company to keep things running. Our forum is for discussing all things ‘IT’ and more.  Our documentation is top notch and written by and for the community.

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